Among the willows, 04 October 2009

2009/10/04

Yup. More willow leaves. Because I can.

MitsMXIII400-ORF_WillowLeaves01

Photo Information:

Camera: Canon AE-1 Program
Lens: Canon 50mm f/1.4 FD
Film: Mitsubishi MX-III (ISO 400), expired
Metering: TTL

And yes, before you ask, this is the same willow tree in the Pagoda Park in downtown Norfolk, whose leaves featured in my post from a few weeks back. Oh yes, I know, I know. There are almost certainly other willow trees elsewhere in the city. This one just happens to be easy to find, and I am such a lazy, lazy creature.

As for the photo itself, quite grainy, ain’t it? As I’ve mentioned before in regards to this expired Mitsubishi film, I assume that this is an effect of the film’s age; since I don’t have access to a new roll of the film, I can’t compare my results to what would come out of a fresh roll. I’m not even sure the film is still manufactured. [1] Regardless, I still prefer true film grain (even when it’s in a digital scan) to what passes for it in digital photos. [2] Sorry folks. I’m prejudiced like that; when I started taking pictures way, way back in prehistory, digital cameras were primarily used by NASA (and other government agencies); consumer-grade digital cameras were few and far between. Film, on the other hand, was plentiful and near the peak of its evolution. [3] As such, I will always have a fondness for the traditional media, even if it is outdated, inconvenient, and other such pejoratives. I still think its fun, and that’s all that matters to me.

Enjoy.

Notes:

[1]: Google was woefully unhelpful here; I did come across a press release for the film type (dated 2001), but couldn’t find any distributors, or even if Mitsubishi still makes the film. Not that I much care, mind you; I just checked to be thorough.

[2]: In case y’all’re wondering, this is why I almost invariably keep my digital camera set to its lowest ISO-equivalent setting (in this case, ISO 64). It becomes inconvenient in dark settings, but I prefer the reduced pixilation of this setting to the faux graininess of the higher settings.

[3]: It also didn’t hurt that I inherited a few solid film cameras from my Dad, who also enjoyed photography as a hobby.

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