Cloudy Skyline, 22 March 2010

2010/03/22

When I started my walk yesterday, the sky was still a bit overcast, but after a half hour or so, the clouds started to break, and the sun came out. Chicago being as large a city as it is, however, different parts of the city experience weather at different times. As such, the sky over the Loop to the south was still a bit overcast with some rather low-altitude clouds, leading to the following view.

D80-CHI_CloudySkyline01_2010-03_21A

Photo Information:

Camera: Nikon D80
Lens: Nikon Nikkor 80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 [1]
ISO Equivalency: 100
Color Setting: Vivid

I’ve actually seen this phenomenon before, though from a much different vantage point (west of the Loop at a friend’s apartment, rather than from my neighborhood (Uptown) to the north). Obviously, the height of the Hancock Building makes this sort of phenomenon possible, though it still is a bit interesting seeing it.

As for the photo itself, the black and white conversion was straightforward, though I did have to adjust the contrast a little due to the distance from which I shot the photo. [2] As such, the highlights in the cloud ended up a bit washed out, and the trees along the lake front ended up a bit darker than I would prefer.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering, those splashes along the lake front are due to the high winds that day. They were rather more impressive up close, but that’s another story for another day.

Enjoy.

Notes:

[1]: Given that this lens is formatted for a 35mm camera, the actual focal length range on a DX-formatted DSLR is approximately 105-300mm (the crop factor for a 35mm-formatted lens on a DX-formatted camera is approximately 1.5x). Obviously, this presents certain advantages for telephoto lenses, though it makes the wideangle lenses a bit more limited.

[2]: Due to atmospheric scattering, the distant objects (in this case, the skyline) have a lower contrast than they otherwise would. Don’t know why that is? Learn.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: