Zeca Bettax, 24 May 2011

2011/05/24

Hey look…even more Bettax photos!

ZecaBettax CHI Acros100 DearbornStation01B

ZecaBettax CHI Acros100 Greenhouse01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 CrazyTree02B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 LoopElevated01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 StClair&OhioN01B

Photo Information:

Photo 1:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; South Loop
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5
Film: Fuji Neopan Acros 100 (120)

The clock tower at Dearborn Street Station, the oldest train station in Chicago. The station was completed in 1885 and designed by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz. In keeping with the time of its construction, the building’s style is Romanesque, which was a common style during the late 19C.

Photo 2:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Lincoln Park Neighborhood
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5
Film: Fuji Neopan Acros 100 (120)

Part of a greenhouse in Lincoln Park. I think the plant on the inside is jasmine.

Photo 3:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Lincoln Park
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (120)

A very shapely tree in Lincoln Park. I’m not sure what sort of tree this one is, but it is quite…curvey.

Photo 4:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; North Loop
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (120)

West-facing view from the Clark & Lake elevated station in the north Loop. The train immediately approaching the station is an Orange Line train headed to Midway; it’s slightly blurry due to a combination of the movement of the train and the slow shutter speed I used – it was getting late in the evening, so I was using a 1/50 sec. shutter speed, meaning that while I could still hand-hold the camera, the speed is slow enough that movement won’t necessarily be frozen by the shot.

Photo 5:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Streeterville Neighborhood
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (120)

North-facing view at St. Clair & Ohio. In the background is the John Hancock Building, with a number of shorter buildings layered in front of it. I first noticed this view when I worked at Lucien Lagrange Architects, whose office was located at Michigan & Ohio, thus affording me the opportunity to wander around the neighborhood during my off hours.

Enjoy.

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