Why yes, I do have more photos to share!

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 CenturyTheater01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 Clark&Deming01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 DiverseyBridge01B

Photo Information:

Location: Chicago, Illinois; Lincoln Park
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5 Radionar
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (120)

The subject of the first photo is the Century Theater on Clark Street just north of Diversey. My AIA Guide to Chicago does not contain any information about this building, but I did find the following website with some information about the theater’s history. As noted on the website, the original interior no longer exists, and the shopping center that now takes its place is also rather uninspiring; the one time I went inside, I was rather unimpressed by the design, and the fact that many of the shops were vacant.

I also don’t know anything about the building in the second photo; all I know is that it now houses, as you can see, a Starbucks. Yup…they’re everywhere. One interesting matter though, is that in the older neighborhoods of the city, this is a fairly common sight, not just for Starbucks, but also for a number of other chain restaurants / retailers that would otherwise stick to standardized designs for their various locations. I like the fact that in the older neighborhoods, places such as this tend to be a little less obtrusive, and a little more respectful of the existing buildings they inhabit.

The subject of the third photo is a lantern on the bridge over the entrance / exit for Diversey Harbor. The bridge and particularly this lantern (there are four total, one at each corner of the bridge) have a vaguely Art Deco appearance to them, which is why I wanted to photograph them.

Enjoy!

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See? I told you I’ve got more photos to post!

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 NearWestConcretePlant01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 TheRookery01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 WashingtonBlock01B

Photo Information:

Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5 Radionar
Film: Kodak TMax 100

Photo 1:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Near West Side

Hey look…a concrete factory! I have mentioned before how much I like industrial settings, right?

Photo 2:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Loop

This is the Rookery (designed by Burnham & Root and completed in 1888; it has also been renovated a number of times since its completion) at the southeast corner of LaSalle and Adams. As impressive as the outside is, the light court in the center of the building is the real attraction of the building; I’ll have to get in there one of these days with faster film to shoot it.

Photo 3:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Loop

This fine looking building is the Washington Block (designed by Frederick & Edward Baumann and completed in 1874) at the southwest corner of Wells & Washington. You can see part of the Loop elevated tracks in the upper left-hand corner of the photo. And yes, I did shoot this photo from the mdidle of the street…but don’t worry; I timed the traffic so that I could do this with relatively little risk of harm.

Enjoy!

Okay, so I’m really, really going to try to make some progress with that massive backlog of negatives I still have yet to scan from last year. There’s also the small matter of the rolls of film I need to process from earlier this year, too, but I’ll get to those…eventually. I hope. On that note, here are some of those photos.

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 BarbedWire01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 BudweiserSign01B

ZecaBettax CHI TMax100 LoadingDock01B

Photo Information:

Location: Chicago, Illinois; Near West Side
Camera: Zeca Bettax
Lens: Schneider-Kreuznach 105mm f/4.5 Radionar
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (120)

Photo 1:
Hey look…barbed wire. Actually, it’s barbed and razor wire…fun, right?

Photo 2:
Hand-painted sign for G&Z Restaurant & Bar; those of y’all who’ve been reading these posts long enough will know of my fixation on hand-painted signage. Those of y’all who don’t? I like ’em. They’re examples of a dying art form, and those that remain are slowly fading into obscurity. It’s impressive and depressing at the same time.

Photo 3:
Yup, a loading dock…and a fire escape. I love old masonry structures, and I really loved the interplay of shadows and shapes in this photo.

More will follow, I promise. Enjoy!

Check it out…more night photos!

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 WrigleyEntrance_Night01B

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 WrigleyTribune_Night01B

Photo Information:

Location: Chicago, Illinois; Streeterville Neighborhood
Camera: Hasselblad 500CM
Lens: Carl Zeiss 80mm f/2.8 Planar (Photo 1); Carl Zeiss 50mm f/4 Distagon (Photo 2)
Film: Ilford HP5+ EI1600 (120)

The first photo is a shot of the entrance to the Wrigley Building – yes, those are the Christmas decorations. Hey…I said it had been a while since I edited my photos! The second photo is a shot of the Wrigley Building (on the left) and the Tribune Tower (on the right), as seen from the south side of the intersection of Michigan and Wacker (don’t worry…I was standing on a median at the time, so I wasn’t in much danger of being hit by a car).

Enjoy!

As promised, here are some more photos for your viewing pleasure!

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 ChicagoTemple_Night01B

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 LaSalle&Madison_Night01B

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 MarshallField_Night01B

Photo Information:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Loop
Camera: Hasselblad 500CM
Lens: Carl Zeiss 80mm f/2.8 Planar
Film: Ilford HP5+ EI1600 (120)

Photo 1:
Yup, you can tell it’s been a while since I edited any photos. This is the official Chicago Christmas Tree, with the Chicago Temple in the background.

Photo 2:
View from LaSalle & Madison, facing south towards the Chicago Board of Trade Building.

Photo 3:
View from the southwest corner of State and Washington, facing the southwest corner of the Marshall Field Building.

Enjoy!

Hey folks…yeah, I know. It’s been a while, hasn’t it? Well…I got a new job, and I’ve been dragging my feet at adopting anything resembling a schedule, using the excuse that since I work evenings, it’s just gonna be weird. Anyways, that’s really BS, ain’t it? Ultimately, I’ve just been lazy, so I intend to address that. To start with, here’s a selection of shots I took last October! Yeah, I know…I’ve got a massive backlog of film I’ve gotta scan (and even more that I need to process), so you’ll be seeing some old shots for a little while. OTOH, you wouldn’t know that they were old unless I told you…

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 A-Finkl&SonsInt01B

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 A-Finkl&SonsInt02B

Hass500CM CHI HP5+ 1600 CTA-Subway01B

Photo Information:
Camera: Hasselblad 500CM
Lens: Carl Zeiss 80mm f/2.8 Planar
Film: Ilford HP5+ EI1600 (120)

Photos 1 & 2:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Bucktown Neighborhood

These two shots are of the interior of the A. Finkl & Sons factory located on the Chicago River on the eastern edge of the Bucktown Neighborhood. The interior, as you can imagine, is rather dark compared to the outside, which is why I chose to shoot these at EI1600, even though I was standing in doorways looking into the interiors. These are, of course, quite similar to shots I took with my D80 a few weeks prior, and due to the success of that shoot, I decided to come back and shoot again with my Hasselblad. The glare on the left-hand side of the first frame is due to the light outside the door, not a proceesing error.

Photo 3:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Loop

This is the interior of the Monroe stop on the CTA Red Line; it’s at night, but that really doesn’t matter so much for the interior, as it’s always this dark. The time of day was, however, a factor in how empty the station was, which was also why I wanted to take this shot.

Anyways, as mentioned previously, I do hope to resume adding more content here in the near future, so stay tuned.

Enjoy!

Yes, I’m back in business with a computer, so now I can get back to playing around with my film scans and such. No, it isn’t a new computer, but it works, so I’m not complaining.

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 CTA-Elevated01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 DrakeHotelLantern01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 IllinoisNatlGuargBldg01B

Photo Information:

Camera: Leica IIIf
Lens: Leitz 50mm f/2 Summitar (Photos 1 & 2); 35mm f/3.5 Elmar (Photo 3)
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (135)

Photo 1:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Lakeview Neighborhood

Yup, another view of the underside of the CTA elevated tracks. I love these old tracks!

Photo 2:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Streeterville Neighborhood

This is one of the lanterns next to the main entrance to the Drake Hotel (completed in 1920 and designed by Marshall & Fox) in the Streeterville Neighborhood (a few blocks north of the John Hancock Building). Given the name of the hotel, the motif of the lanterns sure is appropriate, ain’t it?

Photo 3:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Edgewater Neighborhood

Now part of the Chicago Parks District as an indoor recreational facility, the building was originally built as an indoor ice skating rink (completed in 1916 and designed by Carpenter & Weldon; formerly the Winter Garden Ice Skating Rink, then the Broadway Armory); considering that the building was completed during the height of World War I, it is not known whether or not the building was ever used for its original intended purpose. Following the WWI, then Illinois National Guard modified the building into an armory and training facility, though it was also opened to the public as a recreational facility.

Enjoy.

More photos from my Leica…can’t say much today…having computer troubles, so I may be distracted for a little while resolving that. Fun stuff, I swear.

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 BrynMawrApts01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 ChicagoWindows01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 Clark&Division01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 Dearborn&Division01B

Photo Information:

Location: Chicago, Illinois; Edgewater Neighborhood (Photos 1 & 2), Gold Coast Neighborhood (3 & 4)
Camera: Leica IIIf
Lens: Leitz 135mm f/4 Hektor (Photo 1); 50mm f/2 Summitar (Photos 2, 3, & 4)
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (135)

The first two photos are parts of building façades in the Edgewater Neighborhood, while the latter two are of corner buildings in the Gold Coast Neighborhood on Division Street (at Clark and Dearborn, respectively).

Enjoy.

Yes, I still have some more shots to share from my Canon…have I mentioned how many frames I have to work with when I shoot 135 film?

AE1P CHI TMax100 MerchandiseMart01B

AE1P CHI TMax100 MerchandiseMart02B

AE1P CHI TMax100 MerchandiseMart03B

AE1P CHI TMax100 RelianceBldg01B

AE1P CHI TMax100 SteubenClubBldg01B

Photo Information:

Camera: Canon AE-1 Program
Lens: Canon 50mm f/1.4 FD (Photo 1); 70-210mm f/4 FD (Photos 2, 3, & 5); 24mm f/2.8 FD (Photo 4)
Film: Kodak TMax 100 (135)

Photos 1, 2, & 3:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; River North

These three photos are shots of the inimitable Merchandise Mart (completed in 1930 and designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst, & White). I say “inimitable” because really…how many office / retail buildings do you know of that contain over 4 million square feet of rentable space – and do so with such style (in this case, Art Deco style)?

Photo 4:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Loop

This building is also one of my favorites, the Reliance Building (completed in 1895 and designed by Burham & Root); the building is one of the earliest expressions of what would become the norm with tall buildings, namely, possessing a steel load-bearing internal frame and having a façade dominated by glass, and not masonry. The façade also contains the first full expressions of the famous Chicago Window (i.e. a large, fixed center panel flanked by two smaller operable windows).

Photo 5:
Location: Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Loop

This is the Steuben Club Building (completed in 1929 and designed by Vitzthum & Burns), located on west Randolph Street and now known by the creative name, 188 W. Randolph Street. I especially appreciate the limestone details at the top of the tower; the building itself is currently undergoing renovation into condos or lofts (I forget which), hence the scaffolding around the sides of the building (visible on the left-hand side of the photo).

Enjoy.

I’m switching gears a bit here, since I have plenty of other photos to post – have I mentioned lately that I have a massive backlog of photo scans to work through?

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 Broadway&Granville01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 Broadway&Granville02B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 BroadwayBankBldg01B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 BroadwayBankBldg02B

LeicaIIIf CHI TMax100 BroadwayBankBldg03B

Photo Information:

Location: Chicago, Illinois; Edgewater Neighborhood
Camera: Leica IIIf
Lens: Leitz 50mm f/2 Summitar (Photos 1 & 3); 135mm f/4.5 Hektor (Photos 2, 4, & 5)
Film: Kodak TMax 100

The subject of Photos 1 & 2 is Granville Pictures, a frame shop located (appropriately enough) at Broadway and Granville in the Edgewater Neighborhood (north of my home neighborhood of Uptown). I particularly liked the old signs hanging over the storefronts, as well as the clock on the corner of the building; the building detailing isn’t so bad, either. The subject of Photos 3, 4, & 5 is the Broadway Bank Building (completed in 1925 and designed by R. Bernard Kurzon; formerly Riviera-Burnstine Motor Sales), located on Broadway & Elmdale – also in the Edgewater Neighborhood. One can infer that most of the first floor space behind the storefronts was once an open floor space to accommodate the car displays for which the building was originally designed. Based on the older photo in the AIA Guide to Chicago, there was once a large sign bolted to the corner of the building; you can see the attachment points in Photo 5.

As you should be able to infer from the title of this post, I shot these photos with my Leica IIIf, an older screwmount camera (one of the last of the Barnack line of Leica designs). When I’m shooting 135 film, I do sometimes prefer using this camera (or my Contax IIa, which is roughly equivalent in terms of size and features) to my SLRs (like my FM-2 or AE-1 Program), due to the former being much more compact (and lighter) than the latter. For those of y’all who aren’t familiar with these cameras, the Leica is a rangefinder camera, which means that it lacks two features that add substantially to the weight and complexity of any SLR: 1) they lack the reflex mirror common to all SLRs; and 2) they also lack the large pentaprism viewfinder, which is a massive piece of mirrored glass. This does add some minor disadvantages to the rangefinder cameras, the most significant of which is that the viewfinder does not show what the lens itself is “seeing.” As such, it can be difficult to compose a shot, but this is generally only a problem the closer one gets to the subject of the composition (which includes telephoto shots). That being said, since I generally shoot from some distance away (most of my subjects, in case you haven’t yet noticed, are buildings and such), it usually isn’t much of a problem for me.

Enjoy.